Top 5 Teas for Kids

Many children love tea, especially if it’s something they’ve grown up drinking. However, it’s never too late to introduce your kids to the world of tea. These time-tested, kid-approved teas are regularly requested by the children in our community, both at our shop and the Westport Farmer’s Market. Learn more about the taste and benefits of these wonderful teas for kids.

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Ceremonial vs. Culinary Grade Matcha

You may have been wondering about the difference between the two grades of Matcha green tea powder that we offer – Ceremonial and Culinary. Is one better than the other, and which one should you get?

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How to Store Tea

How to Store Tea

In general, the shelf life of tea is about one year. A little less for fresh green teas and light oolongs, and longer for more oxidized teas like black tea. But one year is a good point of reference for most teas and tisanes. Learn to properly store tea to preserve the flavor and health benefits of your tea. These storage tips apply to all teas, except for pu’er tea – you’ll find a separate section about pu’er below. If you are interested in aging teas, which is only possible with certain types of tea, you can follow these storage tips read more about the art of aged tea.

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Timeless Teas – The Art of Aged Tea

Just like fine wine, there are certain varieties of tea that age beautifully, accentuating or transforming their flavor and increasing their value. While most teas have a shelf life of about a year, after which the flavor becomes dull and stale, specific varieties of white, oolong and pu’er tea taste even better with time. Artfully aging high-quality tea bestows tea leaves with astonishing depth of flavor and complexity, as well as the special essence of time that the soul savors with delight. In order to be considered “aged” tea must be at least 5 years old but can be aged upwards of 50 years if stored in good condition.

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Jasmine: A Tea for Love

Jasmine, Jasminum officinale or Jasminum sambac, is a flower famous and well-loved for its wonderful fragrance and often enjoyed when it is paired with Green Tea, or sometimes Black tea or Oolong tea, from the Camellia sinensis plant.  It is part of many traditional Asian and Middle Eastern tea cultures, including China, Japan, Vietnam, and Iran, but has made its way into Western tea culture of the modern day and to our some of our uplifting tea blends at Arogya.

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Tea 201: What Makes a Tea Unique?

Picking up from where Part 1 left off, today’s post will discuss tea harvesting. Read on to learn the different methods by which traditional and modern teas are harvested, as well as how seasons influence the tea we drink and what “first flush” actually means. 

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Coffee to Tea Signature Cleanse

We, at Arogya, have created a comprehensive and holistic Coffee-to-Tea Signature Cleanse to help you make the transition from coffee to tea, reduce your caffeine consumption, and help your body revitalize its natural balance and bring your body, mind, and spirit to a place of harmony and restoration.  Each day, you will start with a caffeinated tea and as the weeks progress, the caffeine concentrations will decrease.

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Tea 201: What Makes a Tea Unique?

Have you ever wondered how one plant (Camellia sinensis) can be crafted into a near infinite number of varieties of tea? Or have you found yourself curious about tea culture prior to the English teapot and beyond today’s ubiquitous tea bags?

We hope you enjoy this first chapter of our current work-in-progress: an educational series exploring and demystifying Chinese teas, as well as the rich culture behind them. This post will begin with an introduction to the plant, examining its cultivation as well as how terroir influences the final product. Future posts will examine harvesting, processing, and eventually take us on a complete journey through the subtle differences between each type of tea and their known benefits.

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