Moroccan Tea Culture

Not only is Morocco one of the biggest tea importers in the world, but its tea culture is considered an art form. It’s believed that tea was first introduced to Morocco in the 18th century and began spreading throughout the country in the mid-1800s, when trade between North Africa and Europe was flourishing.  Today, Morocco

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English Afternoon Tea Time

This is the first of a series of blogs that take you on a little tour of tea ceremonies and traditions around the world.

Today, let’s start with a country famous for her tea time since the 18th century: The United Kingdom. 

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A Bit About the Story of Tea

Tea has a fascinating history that has been interwoven through countless cultures in different ways over many centuries. The following is only a taste of how Nature’s finest brew has touched, influenced, and inspired humanity over time. 

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A Tea to Help You Detox Both Body & Mind

According to the ancient practice of Chinese medicine, optimal health is achieved when five metaphorical elements that exist within the body ­ wood, fire, earth, metal, and water­ are in harmony.  Spring, which is finally around the corner, is associated with wood. 

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About Arogya

Read more about Arogya in our Brochure.

Learn more about Arogya Holistic Healing, Yoga, and Fine Teas as well as wellness services including acupuncture and massage available at our location in downtown Westport, Connecticut. See the Arogya Brochure for more information about Arogya Holistic Healing or call us at 203-226-2682.

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A Soothing Winter Tonic: Our Turmeric Ginger Tisane

The best healing blend to battle the cold! Counter the seasonal chill with our Turmeric Ginger Tisane, a wholesome blend of turmeric, ginger, licorice root, lemongrass, and citrus.  In addition to tasting wonderful, this herbal tea is an ideal healing tonic.

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Bancha Hojicha

Bancha Hojicha is the perfect tea for the season!

Hojicha is unique among Japanese teas because it is roasted in a porcelain pot over charcoal, whereas most Japanese teas are steamed.

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