Jasmine: A Tea for Love

Jasmine, Jasminum officinale or Jasminum sambac, is a flower famous and well-loved for its wonderful fragrance and often enjoyed when it is paired with Green Tea, or sometimes Black tea or Oolong tea, from the Camellia sinensis plant.  It is part of many traditional Asian and Middle Eastern tea cultures, including China, Japan, Vietnam, and Iran, but has made its way into Western tea culture of the modern day and to our some of our uplifting tea blends at Arogya.

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Tea 201: What Makes a Tea Unique?

Picking up from where Part 1 left off, today’s post will discuss tea harvesting. Read on to learn the different methods by which traditional and modern teas are harvested, as well as how seasons influence the tea we drink and what “first flush” actually means. 

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Coffee to Tea Signature Cleanse

We, at Arogya, have created a comprehensive and holistic Coffee-to-Tea Signature Cleanse to help you make the transition from coffee to tea, reduce your caffeine consumption, and help your body revitalize its natural balance and bring your body, mind, and spirit to a place of harmony and restoration.  Each day, you will start with a caffeinated tea and as the weeks progress, the caffeine concentrations will decrease.

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Goddess of Tiny Blossoms

My deep appreciation for tea began when I was a child growing up in China. There tea has been an integral part of everyday life for centuries. My parents would drink tea throughout the day, taking pause to savor each cup. My father’s favorite tea has always been classic dragon well green tea, while my mother prefers jasmine green. Jasmine also holds a special place in my heart. I love its aroma and the story of how the flower’s blossoms are infused with green or white tea leaves many times to receive the most potent flavor yet without any other additives. Jasmine’s aroma opens one’s senses

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Homemade Digestive Spice Blend

Wei’s Digestive Spice Blend

One of my favorite spice blends to uplift a pot of noodles or rice is the Japanese spice powder called shichimi togarashi. Being a lover of DIY kitchen projects, I decided to make my own adaptation of this digestive spice blend with an Arogya-touch. Not only does this blend bring an added dimension of flavor and depth to any meal, it also has medicinal value. In Chinese medicine, healthy digestion comes with good stomach-fire. When the stomach-fire is weak, digestion is poor, which also affects other systems of the body including immunity. This well-balanced, anti-inflammatory and flavor-enhancing powder promotes healthy stomach fire, and thus, improves digestion.

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Matcha Latte & How to Make Matcha Tea

The Allure of the Matcha Latte & How to Make a Perfect Cup of Matcha

Matcha is having a good year. If you are unfamiliar with Matcha, it’s a powdered green tea made famous by Japanese Zen monks. It has been used for centuries to create a sense of calm and focused alertness in both meditation and mindful living. We’ve been seeing all kinds of recipes lately using Matcha in sweets, hot drinks and cocktails. Matcha is also showing up more and more in coffee shops and cafés. Even Starbucks now features a Teavana Green Tea Latte made with Matcha (and a whopping 40 grams of sugar per 12 oz cup). Though I’m familiar with traditionally brewed Matcha, which creates a naturally creamy, frothy, sweet, umami and tremendously satisfying cup of opaque green tea, I was inspired by the Americanized recipes using Matcha. I set out to make an Arogya-style Matcha Latte, made with homemade almond milk and our ceremonial grade Matcha.

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Bancha Hojicha

Bancha Hojicha is the perfect tea for the season!

Hojicha is unique among Japanese teas because it is roasted in a porcelain pot over charcoal, whereas most Japanese teas are steamed.

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Green Tea 101

I will always remember those misty Shanghai mornings as a young girl, when I entered our little kitchen after getting out of bed, and seeing my father make his ritual cup of Long Jing Dragon Well Green Tea. He carefully dropped a large pinch of thick emerald green tea leaves into the belly of his Gaiwan (traditional Chinese teacup), before meditatively pouring steaming hot water over them.

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