Teaware 101: Yixing Teapot, Perfect for Pu’er and Oolong

There is a huge variety of teaware available, and at Arogya we get many questions about which kind of teapot is best. Glass, cast-iron, unglazed clay, or porcelain? The truth is, it depends on which kind of tea you prefer to drink. There are certain teapots that work well with all teas, while other teapots truly enhance specific kinds of tea. One of my favorite teapots, the unglazed yixing teapot, is amazing for pu’er and oolong teas. It’s also the original teapot! In this, and the next couple blog posts, we will explore the different styles of teapots, which teas, and tea drinkers they work best for, and little history behind the development of the teapot, starting with the classic yixing teapot.

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Goddess of Tiny Blossoms

My deep appreciation for tea began when I was a child growing up in China. There tea has been an integral part of everyday life for centuries. My parents would drink tea throughout the day, taking pause to savor each cup. My father’s favorite tea has always been classic dragon well green tea, while my mother prefers jasmine green. Jasmine also holds a special place in my heart. I love its aroma and the story of how the flower’s blossoms are infused with green or white tea leaves many times to receive the most potent flavor yet without any other additives. Jasmine’s aroma opens one’s senses

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Creamy Masala Chai

I’ll never forget the first time I enjoyed a cup of classic masala chai tea. I was 20 years old and had just embarked on what would be the first of many trips to India in the decade that followed. It was about 5:00 in the morning and the overnight bus I was aboard from Delhi to the northern city of Dharamsala pulled over on the side of a road in a tiny town nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas.

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A Closer Look into Waldorf Education

I have always been fascinated by the Waldorf educational system. Waldorf schools offer classical education that integrates experiential and artistic learning, in an environment emphasizing academic excellence, respect for diversity, and reverence for the natural world. Recently, I had the opportunity to interview Therese Leaderer and Christina Dixcy, both faculty members at the Housatonic Valley Waldorf School in Newtown, CT. As Waldorf faculty, their mission is to develop each child’s unique capacity to engage meaningfully in the world by inspiring creative thinking, moral sensibility, and passion for learning. Here is some of our conversation about Waldorf education in our modern world.

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The Transition of Autumn

As the days darken and our shadows grow, this time of year calls on us to reconnect with the intuitive, receptive and yielding (yin) aspects of ourselves to balance out the more vigorous and vibrant energies (yang) that permeate in the summer. With its enchanting leaves and crisp winds, autumn serves as a guide for us to shift our attention inward and restore balance within ourselves to sustain our vitality as we prepare for the rooting, resting and quietude that the world of winter brings.

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A Healthier Twist on Apple Crisp

Just over a week before my son Silas was born, I ventured to my Aunt Martha’s farm in Katonah, New York to go apple picking with Wei and her daughter Rose.  It was one of the last balmy days of summer and we found ourselves dreaming of the crisp autumn days that have since arrived.

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Green Goodness Part 3: Salad Greens

As I mentioned in our first Green Goodness blog post about Steamed Kale, my meal never feels complete without a generous serving of greens. Whether I’m making a simple salad for dinner, or I’m packing my lunch for work, I love to get creative with my salad and use a variety of fresh greens. It’s easy to get in a rut with arugula and romaine, so today I’m going to guide you through a selection of gourmet, nutritious and fun salad greens to make your salads more exciting. And if you need some salad dressing inspiration, our three favorite dressings will compliment any of these greens.

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Effortless & Wholesome Grains, Part 3: Quinoa

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) has become famous in the last decade as a superfood, because of its high levels of protein and dense nutrition. One cup of cooked quinoa contains 8 grams of protein, more than any other grain. Technically its actually not a grain, but a tiny seed from South America, where it has been cultivated for thousands of years. To the Incas, quinoa was a sacred food they called it the “mother of all grains.”

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Essential Protein: Tofu Scramble Recipe

This simple tofu scramble recipe is one of our favorite (and fastest) ways to prepare a protein-rich vegetarian dish. I was first inspired to make this dish after tasting a similar preparation at Bloodroot, our local vegan and vegetarian restaurant in the Black Rock section of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

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